. Home | About Us | Services | Articles & Tips | Interactive | Events | Reviews | Houston Guide | Shop Check out our NEW web site!

Shop
Search Merlino Fitness
Join our e-newsletter: enter e-mail

. Home
. About Us
.... Company
.... Web Site
.... Press Releases
.... Our Team
.... Philosophy
.... Credentials
.... Advisory Board
.... Why Hire Us?
.... People Are Saying
.... Photo Galleries
.... Contact Us
.... Feedback
. Services
.... Initial Consultation
.... Fitness Assessment
.... Body Composition
.... Personal Training
.... Bowflex Training
.... Nutrition Consulting
.... Phone Consulting
.... Workshops
.... Seminars
.... Start Your Program
.... Michael's Schedule
.... New Client Questionnaire
.... Initial Consultaiton
. Shop
.... New Store Arrivals
.... What's On Sale
.... Fitness Services
.... Exercise Equipment
.... Resistance Training Equipment
.... Cardio Training Equipment
.... Heart Rate Monitors
.... Workout Gloves
.... Workout Gloves Wraps/Straps
.... Jump Ropes
.... Exercise Balls
.... DeFeet Sports Socks
.... DeFeet Aireator Socks
.... DeFeet Speede Socks
.... DeFeet Cush Socks
.... DeFeet Wool Socks
.... DeFeet Hiking Socks
.... DeFeet Accessories
.... Nutritional Supplements
.... Healthy Snacks
.... Sports Drinks
.... Running
.... Cycling
.... Flexibility
.... Rehabilitation
.... Software
.... Books
.... Miscellaneous
.... Policies/Shipping
.... Disclaimer
. Articles & Tips
.... Latest Articles
.... Article Archives
.... Tip Archives
.... FAQ Archives
.... Nutrition
.... Grocery Store Picks
.... Food & Cooking
.... General Fitness
.... Personal Training
.... Weight Training
.... Cardio Training
.... Running
.... Cycling
.... Fitness Equipment
.... Injuries & Rehab
.... Health & Wellness
.... Personal Growth
.... Career Development
.... Personal Finances
. Fitness Tools
.... Pace Calculator
.... Target Heart Rate
.... Caloric Needs
.... Nutritional Needs
.... Body Mass Index
.... Ideal Weight
.... Body Fat Percent
. Chat
. Reviews
.... Books
.... Compact Discs
.... Videos
. News



...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...

 

Articles | FAQs | Ask a ? | Chat

Fitness Equipment Articles & Tips


 


Understanding Treadmill Motors
by Scott Rayner, Fitness Consultant

When discussing treadmills with a sales representative, the topic of motors will inevitably arise. During this discussion, you will hear some engineering-type terminology, including AC, DC, and continuous and peak horsepower. A basic understanding of these terms will help you to ask the right questions and make the right purchase.

DEFINING THE TERMS

1) Fixed Speed Alternating Current (AC) Motors:
Uses a transmission to regulate the speed of the treadmill, while the motor runs at a constant speed.

What you need to know: Running at a constant speed puts less stress on the motor, but the transmission introduces extra parts.

2) Direct Current (DC) Motors:
Regulates speed directly (using variable voltage and not a transmission), meaning the motor itself changes speeds as the user makes adjustments.

What you need to know: No transmission (so fewer moving parts), but does require a motor control board. It also contains brushes that wear down over time. DC motors are used in a majority of treadmills on the market.

3) Variable Speed AC Motors
Also regulates speed directly and connects directly to the drive belt.

What you need to know: Like DC motors, these AC motors have no transmission, but they also do not use brushes. Usually higher quality.

4) Peak Horsepower:
The maximum horsepower a motor is capable of reaching before stalling out.

What you need to know: In actual use, peak horsepower is never achieved and is not particularly relevant. Usually found in lower priced treadmills.

5) Continuous Horsepower:
The actual horsepower being used when someone is using the treadmill.

What you need to know: The maximum power the treadmill can provide when used continuously.

HOW MUCH HORSEPOWER IS ENOUGH?

Horsepower is an indication of how much load a motor can pull at a given speed. However, a motor can only pull as much as the power coming out of your wall will allow. For instance, a 120 volt, 15 amp wall outlet will allow a motor no more than 1.8 horsepower. A 220 volt, 20 amp wall outlet will allow no more than 3.8 horse-power. Many other minor variables can lower these figures, but doing a lot of math is not important. It is important to understand what a motor can and cannot do in your situation. It is also important to understand that horsepower should not be your primary consideration in choosing a treadmill. Two motors with the same horsepower will perform differently in different treadmills.

Keep in mind, when thinking about the performance of the motor, AC, DC, and horsepower, you are thinking about the performance of the motor not the treadmill. The pros and cons of different motors is much more of a maintenance and cost consideration than of how the treadmill feels beneath your feet.

Contact Scott at Quantum Fitness in Houston at 281.495.3003 or scottr@quantumfitness.com. Scott can help if you need more information on purchasing home or commercial fitness equipment.

View Scott's Bio
View our frequently asked questions & answers
Ask Merlino Fitness a fitness equipment question


Disclaimer | E-mail Merlino Fitness


" Train for Life
"

Merlino Fitness • PMB 267, 1302 Waugh Drive • Houston TX 77019 • 713.523.2577

Copyright 1999-2003, Merlino Fitness, MerlinoFitness.com, all rights reserved
The information, content, code and navigation contained on this and all pages throughout this entire web site
are protected by US copyright laws and cannot be duplicated in whole or in part without the express written consent of Merlino Fitness and MerlinoFitness.com